Environment

Cumberland Trails EXTREME WILDFIRE DANGER

Cumberland Trails EXTREME WILDFIRE DANGER

At issue is the forecasted hot and dry weather conditions over the August long weekend and beyond, with no significant precipitation in the forecast. With wildfire danger ratings at local stations already at Extreme, all users of the Cumberland trails are asked to be extra cautious and vigilant while recreating in the trail system.

Beaver Stories, Science and Stewardship

Join us for our first ever CCFS Science Pub ONLINE this Friday Night at 730 pm! Pour yourself a beer (or beverage of your choosing), kick back and get ready for a deep dive into facts and fancy about Beavers! This furry little engineer has a long history and their impacts on the landscape are visible all around the Village of Cumberland. From weird beaver art, to strange beaver rumours, to amazing beaver behavior – get ready for a fun filled evening of learning and laughter.

Briony Penn Speaks at Project Watershed’s Annual General Meeting

Comox Valley Project Watershed Society is hosting their AGM on May 30th and has lined up Briony Penn as their keynote speaker. Briony Penn is a well-known environmental artist, educator and writer. “We are very excited to have Briony speak, her humour and knowledge about the natural world are inspiring in these uncertain times.” said Caitlin Pierzchalski, Project Watershed Executive Director.

New Species on Vancouver Island

The “Comox Lake Bluffs Ecological Reserve” was set aside mainly for its rare and vulnerable plants in an unusual dry-site community of plants that one would normally associate with dry grasslands. The Comox Valley is greatly indebted to Betty Brookes for initiating and driving community efforts to set aside this jewel in our natural heritage as of May 1988.

Linda’s List : The Spring Pest Edition

Realizing that many new subscribers will not have seen some of these notes in previous years, here is a roundup on common pests at this time of year and what to do about them:

Linda’s List : The Spring Pest Edition

Linda’s List : The Spring Pest Edition

Realizing that many new subscribers will not have seen some of these notes in previous years, here is a roundup on common pests at this time of year and what to do about them:

Earth Week With Project Watershed

Earth Week With Project Watershed

Spring has sprung and we are busy planning for Earth Week 2021! Earth Week is April 16 – 22, 2021, and Project Watershed is celebrating the planet with a host of activities to support the health of Comox Valley Lands and Waters. These activities include a 50/50 raffle, scavenger hunt, and a shoreline cleanup. People who participate in the Earth Week activities and post photos to social media will be entered to win $20 gift cards from the Peninsula Coop.

Cumberland Forest Celebrates Earth Week

Cumberland Forest Celebrates Earth Week

Join the Cumberland Forest and friends from across the Valley for the Cumberland Earth Week Festival, April 19-25th. The global theme for Earth Day 2021 is “Restore the Earth”. Whether you live in the Village, the wider Comox Valley, the Salish Sea region or across the globe – you are invited to connect for this celebration of biodiversity, restoration, regeneration, climate resilience, and community action.

Comox Valley Naturalists Working to Protect Wetland Areas

Comox Valley Naturalists Working to Protect Wetland Areas

This has been a challenging season for the Comox Valley Naturalists Society (CVN) Wetlands Restoration group not least because of COVID-19 restrictions. A small but dedicated group of CVN volunteers continued stewardship activities primarily in Little River Nature Park and Courtenay Airpark.

CVN Invites The Public To Learn About Humpback Whales In Our Waters

CVN Invites The Public To Learn About Humpback Whales In Our Waters

The fortunate increase of Humpbacks along BC’s coast is a game changer for vessels of all sizes. It is essential for boaters to know how unpredictable Humpbacks can be. They are often oblivious of boats and do not have the biosonar/echolocation of toothed whales like Orca. They can suddenly surface after long dives and are often moving in unpredictable patterns whereby, if it is assumed that they are travelling in a straight line, risk of collision is increased. The preliminary results of MERS research also indicate how severe a threat entanglement is with ~50% of the Humpback Whales having scarring from entanglement. These are the survivors. Most whales who die from collision or entanglement sink to the bottom of the ocean.

1st Annual Cumberland Fungus Fest

1st Annual Cumberland Fungus Fest

This 4 day experiment in hybrid virtual/real world programming features 5 live stream talks with fungus experts, an online CCFS Science Pub panel, dance events, film screenings, a bio blitz, myelium themed playlists, pop up performance art, kids art projects, a mushroom market and more. Your $25 unlocks a whole world of discovery with exclusive links to online events, downloads, films and presentations. The best part? 100% of proceeds support biodiversity projects of the CCFS.

Anxiety is Running High for Families Everywhere.

Anxiety is Running High for Families Everywhere.

While a lot of focus is rightly being placed on the safety of students, less discussed are the very real implications on the rest of the family “bubble” (core group of people who maintain physical distance from others and can safely be close to each other during the pandemic). Grandparents, who often serve as the linch pin of the family’s day to day operations, will be facing tough decisions on how to remain safely connected to their grandchildren as a potential second wave of COVID-19 hits this fall

Environmental Testing at Air Force Beach

Environmental Testing at Air Force Beach

SLR Consulting, under contract from the Department of National Defence (DND) and as part of 19 Wing Comox’s environmental monitoring program, will be installing five water-monitoring devices along the DND property line at Air Force Beach starting Sunday

Holocaust of the Old-Growth Forests

Holocaust of the Old-Growth Forests

In June, a team of independent scientists, headed by Rachel Holt, revealed that the NDP have been obscuring how much old forest is left. She called their words, “incredibly misleading.” The official tally says there is 23% of the original ancient forest left. Rachel Holt claims most of that 23% are small old alpine trees and/or small old trees in boggy forests. She explains that big old forests make up 1% of that 23%. She predicts that if we keep cutting them down, all will disappear within 12 years. Karen Price, another scientist suggests that” the ecological web of life” is vanishing in front of our eyes. BC Timber Sales, are currently permitting logging in the Taylor River, Upper Tsitika Valley, the Nahmint and the Caycuse, and are poised to cut Dakota Ridge on the Sunshine Coast, home to many black bears and their huge cedar denning trees. Ironically, the Old-Growth Review panel has delayed the official news release until the fall. Unofficially, we know an overwhelming majority of the presenters want to save old-growth forests. This June, a report came out outlining plant and animal species only found in Canada. The conclusions states that we need to protect more lands to protect iconic species. Vancouver Island is the second biggest hotspot in Canada, full of iconic species, and yet it is being raped and pillaged as never before. BC has a global responsibility to save what ancient forest is left for many reasons:

Shoreline Cleanups are Back

Shoreline Cleanups are Back

The Shoreline Cleanup, a conservation partnership of Ocean Wise and WWF-Canada, is back up and running and asking for volunteers to help clean Canada’s shorelines. But cleanups will look a little different, because of COVID-19 safety precautions — they will now be done solo or by small groups, although that doesn’t mean you’re on your own. New resources are available to help you plan, with checklists and reminders on where to look for public-health information.

Lake Trail Community School Garden

Lake Trail Community School Garden

As we re-think what community programming looks like through our organization this summer, we have been turning towards the forest. Connecting with nature and being together, safely, is good for us all. From the community garden to Roy Stewart Morrison Nature Park to Puntledge Park, we are finding ways to continue to build community connections surrounded by the natural world. Further details below!