Tide Change publishes submissions from a variety of authors whose work we admire and words we feel are relevant to our readers. Please note that the views, thoughts, and opinions expressed in the text belong solely to the author, and not necessarily to the author’s employer, organization, committee or other group or individual.

Richard at Long point
Richard at Long point
Richard at Long point
My Favourite Things in The Comox Valley

My Favourite Things in The Comox Valley

This is not an Oprah Favourite Things List, because everything I could list, like my favourite chocolates, shoes, coffee and more, would highlight some of the great shops and boutiques in the valley, but unfortunately not all of them. So, I will focus on my list of favourite things that do not need to be purchased and are a gift to all of us who call this valley home.

Despite Island Health’s Efforts, Overcapacity Still Plagues Hospitals, Stresses Staff

Despite Island Health’s Efforts, Overcapacity Still Plagues Hospitals, Stresses Staff

This month, like last month, and the month before that and every month since the two new North Island Hospitals opened last year, they have been overcapacity. So on most days, staff at the Courtenay and Campbell hospitals struggle to find space to put as many as 30-plus extra patients, and the peak hospitalization season that coincides with the influenza season is just getting started.

A Walk in the Anthropocene

A Walk in the Anthropocene

The term Anthropocene (meaning “man-made”) is the new term scientists are using to describe a new era. It is replacing the former Cenozoic Era that has existed since the death of the dinosaurs, sixty-five million years ago. The dominant characteristic of the Anthropocene is climate change. When I first heard the term “Anthropocene” I said to myself, “That’s nice. Something we humans can be proud of.” But my attitude changed when I saw the impact of climate change: the increased number of hurricanes, forest fires, monsoons, rising oceans and flooding, long lines of refugees grasping their children’s hands and leaving behind their dried up farms, carrying little more than the clothing on their backs.

What is Cumberland’s Goal: Save The Ilo Ilo Theatre or Create Performing Arts Space?

What is Cumberland’s Goal: Save The Ilo Ilo Theatre or Create Performing Arts Space?

Does Cumberland want to save the historic Ilo Ilo Theatre or does it want to create a performing arts space in the most viable location? That was a question debated Saturday afternoon in the renovated lobby of the former opera house by about 30 Cumberland business people, residents and performers. It’s an urgent question because Henry Fletcher, who has spent “a stressful” year trying to save the theatre as a performance venue, has reached the end of his resources and is moving back to Toronto this week.

How To Be Happy

How To Be Happy

In order to answer this enigma of what or who will make us happy and when this will be a permanent state of being, we must ultimately be in this world but not of this world. Before you discard this statement as something impractical and not realistic, let me assure you that there are now very concrete examples of why this is true.

Downsizing and Reframing in the Anthropocene

Downsizing and Reframing in the Anthropocene

This past spring my wife Arlene and I decided to downsize and find a better place to live. There were a number of reasons for this decision but a major one came from our efforts to help some elderly friends. Most of them needed walkers to get around. We are elders ourselves. Our former house with its stairs was not “walker friendly” so it was time to make the move.

Can Green Innovations Stop Polluted Stormwater From Killing Our Waters?

Can Green Innovations Stop Polluted Stormwater From Killing Our Waters?

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans slapped a ban on both personal and commercial shellfish harvesting throughout Baynes Sound this week because Sunday’s heavy rainfall, which came “after a prolonged dry spell,” will “adversely affect marine water quality.” It’s a regular notice the DFO issues around most urbanized regions of Vancouver Island this time of year, and it usually lasts for more than a few days. Why? Because every time it rains after a dry period, it’s as if a giant toilet flushes animal feces, fertilizers, pesticides, oils, road salts, heavy metals and other contaminants into our municipal stormwater systems, which in turn send torrents of polluted water directly into our watersheds, killing fish, eroding property and making our waters unsafe for shellfish harvesting.

Time To Put Communicate Back Into Government Communications

Time To Put Communicate Back Into Government Communications

A bit of good news came out of Victoria this week, which could have easily been missed under the avalanche of bad news that was coming out of the capital. British Columbia is now “operating debt-free for the first time in more than 40 years,” according to the province’s second quarterly report. But that’s not really the good news, at least for me. Perhaps – now that the report and all the preparatory work is out of the way – the ministry might find some time to answer a question I had in early October.