Columnists

Tide Change publishes submissions from a variety of authors whose work we admire and words we feel are relevant to our readers. Please note that the views, thoughts, and opinions expressed in the text belong solely to the author, and not necessarily to the author’s employer, organization, committee or other group or individual.

Richard at Long point
Richard at Long point
Richard at Long point

When “Losing Earth” is not an option

When I read Naomi Klein’s challenging and insightful book This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs the Climate I was — despite the dire warnings about the very real possibility of climate collapse —encouraged to think that climate change presents such an immense challenge that dealing with it might force us to rethink the utility of trashing our Earth by wasting everything we can’t use up. Instead of blindly pursing the suicidal idea of infinite growth on a finite planet, perhaps the obvious and dire consequences of climate change will force us to reconsider the possibility of making peace with our planet and among its peoples.

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When Hell Freezes Over

The title of my column is both a reference to an actual event, which I experienced first-hand, and a common phrase used when we choose to stay firmly anchored in our point of view about an individual or group.
I was a local newspaper reporter when The Ice Storm of the Century of January 1998 hit the community I lived in with three consecutive days of freezing rain.

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Let Your Vote Count

Canadians value fairness yet we tolerate a basically unfair system to elect our representatives. In BC this autumn we have an opportunity to correct that problem. Between Oct 22 and Nov. 30 there will be a referendum conducted by mail in ballot in which the question is asked, ‘Do you want to change the present past the post electoral system –yes or no?’ If you do want to change it, you have three choices for proportional representation voting systems and you can decide on the one you want.

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About Our New Season of Chronicles

Some years ago a woman asked Stephen Leacock, the Canadian writer and humourist, if writing was difficult. Leacock responded, “Madam, writing is not difficult. You simply jot down the ideas that occur to you. The writing is simplicity itself. It is ‘the occurring’ that is difficult.”
I thought at the beginning of this second season of chronicles I would outline the ideas that have occurred to me. This will give you an idea of where I have come from and where we will be going in this coming season.

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Best friend, best price or best value

If you’re just tuning back in to B.C. politics, you may have missed a great political adaptation of West Side Story this summer, where two rival gangs – the Liberistas and the Unionistas – compete for the affection of B.C. taxpayers on public infrastructure projects.

The musical was loosely based on this summer’s announcement by the B.C. government that key public-sector infrastructure projects will be tied to pay scales, apprenticeship training, job opportunities for under-represented groups and a union card for any worker “within 30 days of starting employment.”

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Introducing Our New Chief Editor!

We are so excited to have Catherine Hedrich lead the editorial direction of Tide Change and build upon its community foundation of collaborative support. As a new resident of the Comox Valley, her outsider’s perspective will undoubtedly bring fresh and useful insights, while setting the stage for the development of a sustainable and interactive communication platform for our community enterprise, beginning with her new column, Community Conversations.

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The Trickle-Up Effect

As a child of the sixties, I remember the significant role regular people played, who mobilized at the grassroots, in changing the course of history. Think Canadian efforts in the Peace Movement, the Women’s Movement, and the Environmental Movement.

Some big names and well-known faces are associated with each movement, but, we now think of as movements would have been nothing but blips on the historical screen without the discontent, the righteous indignation and the lay-their-freedom-on-the-line action of the nameless and faceless many.

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