Category: Environment

Learn About Microplastics In Baynes Sound

Microplastics have emerged as one of the most ubiquitous global pollutants and can enter the marine food web either via direct consumption or by trophic transfer by consuming animals that have taken up microplastics. Researchers from the University of British Columbia worked closely with the Association for Denman Island Marine Stewards and the K’ómoks Guardian Watchmen in 2019 to establish a baseline of microplastic concentration and composition in and around Baynes Sound and to estimate microplastic consumption and uptake by zooplankton, larval herring, and juvenile herring.

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CVN Invites The Public To Learn About Humpback Whales In Our Waters

The fortunate increase of Humpbacks along BC’s coast is a game changer for vessels of all sizes. It is essential for boaters to know how unpredictable Humpbacks can be. They are often oblivious of boats and do not have the biosonar/echolocation of toothed whales like Orca. They can suddenly surface after long dives and are often moving in unpredictable patterns whereby, if it is assumed that they are travelling in a straight line, risk of collision is increased. The preliminary results of MERS research also indicate how severe a threat entanglement is with ~50% of the Humpback Whales having scarring from entanglement. These are the survivors. Most whales who die from collision or entanglement sink to the bottom of the ocean.

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1st Annual Cumberland Fungus Fest

This 4 day experiment in hybrid virtual/real world programming features 5 live stream talks with fungus experts, an online CCFS Science Pub panel, dance events, film screenings, a bio blitz, myelium themed playlists, pop up performance art, kids art projects, a mushroom market and more. Your $25 unlocks a whole world of discovery with exclusive links to online events, downloads, films and presentations. The best part? 100% of proceeds support biodiversity projects of the CCFS.

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Anxiety is Running High for Families Everywhere.

While a lot of focus is rightly being placed on the safety of students, less discussed are the very real implications on the rest of the family “bubble” (core group of people who maintain physical distance from others and can safely be close to each other during the pandemic). Grandparents, who often serve as the linch pin of the family’s day to day operations, will be facing tough decisions on how to remain safely connected to their grandchildren as a potential second wave of COVID-19 hits this fall

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Environmental Testing at Air Force Beach

SLR Consulting, under contract from the Department of National Defence (DND) and as part of 19 Wing Comox’s environmental monitoring program, will be installing five water-monitoring devices along the DND property line at Air Force Beach starting Sunday

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Holocaust of the Old-Growth Forests

In June, a team of independent scientists, headed by Rachel Holt, revealed that the NDP have been obscuring how much old forest is left. She called their words, “incredibly misleading.” The official tally says there is 23% of the original ancient forest left. Rachel Holt claims most of that 23% are small old alpine trees and/or small old trees in boggy forests. She explains that big old forests make up 1% of that 23%. She predicts that if we keep cutting them down, all will disappear within 12 years. Karen Price, another scientist suggests that” the ecological web of life” is vanishing in front of our eyes. BC Timber Sales, are currently permitting logging in the Taylor River, Upper Tsitika Valley, the Nahmint and the Caycuse, and are poised to cut Dakota Ridge on the Sunshine Coast, home to many black bears and their huge cedar denning trees. Ironically, the Old-Growth Review panel has delayed the official news release until the fall. Unofficially, we know an overwhelming majority of the presenters want to save old-growth forests. This June, a report came out outlining plant and animal species only found in Canada. The conclusions states that we need to protect more lands to protect iconic species. Vancouver Island is the second biggest hotspot in Canada, full of iconic species, and yet it is being raped and pillaged as never before. BC has a global responsibility to save what ancient forest is left for many reasons:

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