Environment

Cumberland Trails EXTREME WILDFIRE DANGER

At issue is the forecasted hot and dry weather conditions over the August long weekend and beyond, with no significant precipitation in the forecast. With wildfire danger ratings at local stations already at Extreme, all users of the Cumberland trails are asked to be extra cautious and vigilant while recreating in the trail system.

Metal Recycling at Kus-kus-sum

In the spirit of summer fun, Project Watershed is holding a contest to see who can guess the number of full bins of metal that will come of the site. If you want to take a stab at estimating, email Caila.Holbrook@projectwatershed.ca, or post your guess to Instagram or Facebook with #metalrecycling and #kuskussum, by Friday June 23rd. The closest three guesses will win a $25 gift certificate from the Peninsula Co-op. If there are more than three correct guesses we will draw three names from those who have guessed correctly.

‘Observation Challenge’ at Seal Bay Nature Park.

‘Observation Challenge’ at Seal Bay Nature Park.

“The Observation Challenge is designed to encourage people to spend time in the park and look for 12 ‘things’ along the 7.3-km multi-use Forest Loop trail,” explains Perrin. [The Coast Salish name for Forest Loop is ‘ʔayigən’, pronounced ‘eye-eee-gin’.] “My friend, Anne Smythe, and I had fun riding through Seal Bay to identify items and then I created a list of 12 clues. Things to look for can be natural or man-made and, with the exception of the first one being close to the parking lot, all items are located on — and visible from — the Forest Loop trail. We encourage all participants to stay on the designated trails and to practice the BCHBC’s commitment to ‘Leave no trace.’ Be sure to pack a water bottle and wear comfortable shoes because it takes about two hours to leisurely walk the Forest Loop.”

Beaver Stories, Science and Stewardship

Beaver Stories, Science and Stewardship

Join us for our first ever CCFS Science Pub ONLINE this Friday Night at 730 pm! Pour yourself a beer (or beverage of your choosing), kick back and get ready for a deep dive into facts and fancy about Beavers! This furry little engineer has a long history and their impacts on the landscape are visible all around the Village of Cumberland. From weird beaver art, to strange beaver rumours, to amazing beaver behavior – get ready for a fun filled evening of learning and laughter.

New Species on Vancouver Island

New Species on Vancouver Island

The “Comox Lake Bluffs Ecological Reserve” was set aside mainly for its rare and vulnerable plants in an unusual dry-site community of plants that one would normally associate with dry grasslands. The Comox Valley is greatly indebted to Betty Brookes for initiating and driving community efforts to set aside this jewel in our natural heritage as of May 1988.

Linda’s List : The Spring Pest Edition

Linda’s List : The Spring Pest Edition

Realizing that many new subscribers will not have seen some of these notes in previous years, here is a roundup on common pests at this time of year and what to do about them:

Earth Week With Project Watershed

Earth Week With Project Watershed

Spring has sprung and we are busy planning for Earth Week 2021! Earth Week is April 16 – 22, 2021, and Project Watershed is celebrating the planet with a host of activities to support the health of Comox Valley Lands and Waters. These activities include a 50/50 raffle, scavenger hunt, and a shoreline cleanup. People who participate in the Earth Week activities and post photos to social media will be entered to win $20 gift cards from the Peninsula Coop.

Cumberland Forest Celebrates Earth Week

Cumberland Forest Celebrates Earth Week

Join the Cumberland Forest and friends from across the Valley for the Cumberland Earth Week Festival, April 19-25th. The global theme for Earth Day 2021 is “Restore the Earth”. Whether you live in the Village, the wider Comox Valley, the Salish Sea region or across the globe – you are invited to connect for this celebration of biodiversity, restoration, regeneration, climate resilience, and community action.

Kus-kus-sum, formerly Field’s Sawmill Demolition

Kus-kus-sum, formerly Field’s Sawmill Demolition

Removing the building is the precursor to the major demolition work that will occur over the summer to remove the 8.3 acres of concrete that covers the site. Soils and other materials will be transported off the site in preparation of regrading it to natural streamside elevations. Waterways will be created on the site and native vegetation will be planted.

Nominate your CVN Tree of the Year

Nominate your CVN Tree of the Year

The Tree of the Year contest is the perfect COVID safe outdoor activity and a wonderful antidote to plant blindness. Ride your bike or walk to actively search our community for a tree you love or know tells a story

Kus-kus-sum Protected

Kus-kus-sum Protected

Another significant milestone has been reached in efforts to acquire, protect and restore a former industrial sawmill site on the banks of the K’ómoks Estuary.

Crown the Comox Valley’s ‘Tree of The Year’

Crown the Comox Valley’s ‘Tree of The Year’

“Easily overlooked and often undervalued, trees deserve their moment in the spotlight,” says CVN Director Karen Cummins. “This contest is simply a fun and inclusive way for people to identify and highlight individual trees in the Comox Valley that hold significant interest, cultural importance, strong heritage value or natural beauty.”