Author: Richard Davis

Surviving Facebook?

As I sat down to write this post about Facebook and its ubiquitous searching/analyzing of human communication for commercial/political vulnerabilities of all of its 3 billion subscribers my thoughts kept coming back to Tolkien’s story of the ring and its magical ability to “bring them all and in the darkness bind them.”

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Poetry with Purpose – Human Infrastructure

It seems like a lot, but we could do more. We are doing an excellent joy in improving the traditional infrastructure but more needs to be done in human infrastructure. The main asset we have is our workforce, especially our youth, who will have the job of cleaning up the mess our generation has left behind. If we concentrate our efforts on this valuable human resource, we can reduce poverty, the damage caused by substance abuse, and the personal and monetary costs of our overworked police, justice systems, and incarceration facilities. We can eventually reduce the demand on social services. In the process we can create and improve well-paying jobs that can ultimately benefit the economy as a whole and in the process increase our GDP

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Linda’s List For April 12: What To Plant; Flowers In The Garden; Gardener Resources

his colder than usual spring seems to be taking forever to warm up (I was breaking ice out of the bird bath again this morning!). Over the next few days, however, the forecast is for the kind of warming we have all been waiting for. Remember, though, that the soil is still pretty cold because so many nights recently have been close to freezing. Peas and early cauliflower that I planted out in in the last couple of weeks have hardly grown at all–which is just reminds me of the joys of overwintered vegetables. With winter cauliflowers, purple sprouting broccoli, kale, spinach and other greens, the last of the carrots, beets and Brussels sprouts, there can still be lots of fresh veggies from a garden at this time of year.

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Living Authentically

Showing up as authentic requires courage and a willingness to make oneself vulnerable. It means letting our real selves be seen, almost like taking our psychological clothes off in public. People who practice authenticity create huge benefits for themselves and build more profound connections with others.

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