On Monday, during a meeting with an excellent local journalist, I was told that my thinking on a particular topic was at the 30,000 feet level. This was his way of stating that few people in this community would both understand and agree with my bird’s eye view of the transformational power of our expanded perception. Let’s see if he is right.

Within the last two months, I have attended three separate local events which asked of its respective audiences to broaden their beliefs by accepting a new understanding of our current reality. They dealt with the autism spectrum, one’s transition (human death) and a new collaborative community model.

With the first, I was in the very appreciative audience during the hilarious, powerfully moving and insightful stand-up comedy set of  Michael McCreary, a comedian on the autism spectrum. As the back cover of his book, Funny, You Don’t Look Autistic, states, “autism doesn’t have a “look”- or a limit. And comedy is all about breaking the ice on topics we might not otherwise talk about”. Next week, I will be publishing the first of a series of articles about autism and how it affects every person, both directly and indirectly in our community. The content will be personal and general, local and national, as well as from an individual and collective perspective. This fractal approach will hopefully begin a much needed open dialogue within our family and all families.

With the second, I listened to an emotional and heartfelt presentation by Barbara Morningstar, author of the book, Honoring the Mystery: Uplifting Insights from the Language, Visions, and Dreams of the Dying.

During her talk, she asked a very important question, “Why do we have difficulty believing”? In the coming weeks, I will be publishing information about the most recent and groundbreaking research on this universal experience and how it can also add to the local community conversation between volunteer hospice workers, staff and those close to individuals preparing to transition.

Finally, the third is the all encompassing vehicle of possibilities, as I absorbed the information given by the five panelists from the Coordinating Circle during an event organized by the recently formed Comox Valley Community Health Network. Their approach is one of synergistic collaboration, where the words and intentions used have their own power of transforming mindsets within their respective community agencies. After the Q & A, where I discussed the organic next step for offering the same immediate potential for connection and collaboration to individual members of our community where they could assist the CVCHN in finding untapped local skills, resources and creative temporary solutions, an audience member suggested to me privately that he would sign up immediately if Tide Change helped facilitate the creation of a forum where the flow of ideas and opportunities could literally help the CVCHN in reaching its ultimate goal of creating a more connected and supportive community. As Editor in Chief of Tide Change, I have now added this task to my to do list, since as an alternative virtual media source, we also play a role in facilitating collective and individual action.

Articles on each of these subjects will be published during this Summer, among the many press releases, columns and community information usually found on the digital communication platform of Tide Change. This promises to be a catalyst period for expanded perception.

Can we both understand and agree to suspend our old view of reality, as an important step on our journey to becoming the change we wish to see in the world?

My view at 30,000 feet is saying all clear for those willing to co-create together.

 

Catherine Hedrich

Editor in Chief, Tidechange.ca