Photo courtesy of Susan Harrison: A fire broke out in Too Good to be Threw thrift store in downtown Courtenay early Sunday morning. 

 

Emergency crews responded to a fire that broke out in Too Good To Be Threw early Sunday morning. The fire is believed to have started in the downtown Courtenay thrift store between midnight and 1 a.m., with multiple witnesses reporting seeing smoke and flames inside the building.

Comox Valley RCMP are at the scene and a cause of the fire is still under investigation. The building and back alley are currently blocked off.

According to an RCMP member at the scene, there were no injuries and neighbouring buildings were not damaged by fire. However, the door of AIDS Vancouver Island, located beside Too Good To Be Threw on 6th Street, was smashed for fire crews to gain access.

The thrift shop is operated by the Comox Valley Transition Society and all profits go towards supporting their programs and services.

Heather Ney, executive director of the CVTS, says she was out of town when she found out about the fire. Back in Courtenay on Sunday morning, she says she still knows very little about what happened and has not been allowed on the property due to safety concerns.

“I’m a little bit in shock,” said Ney. “It’s an important business to the community but it’s also a very important business to the transition society as it sustains a lot of our programs that we provide.”

Ney says the thrift store brings in hundreds of thousands of dollars each year to support women’s and men’s services like Amethyst House, Lilli House and counseling programs.

Comox Valley RCMP are at the scene and a cause of the fire is still under investigation. The building and back alley are currently blocked off.

According to an RCMP member at the scene, there were no injuries and neighbouring buildings were not damaged by fire. However, the door of AIDS Vancouver Island, located beside Too Good To Be Threw on 6th Street, was smashed for fire crews to gain access.

The thrift shop is operated by the Comox Valley Transition Society and all profits go towards supporting their programs and services.

Heather Ney, executive director of the CVTS, says she was out of town when she found out about the fire. Back in Courtenay on Sunday morning, she says she still knows very little about what happened and has not been allowed on the property due to safety concerns.

“I’m a little bit in shock,” said Ney. “It’s an important business to the community but it’s also a very important business to the transition society as it sustains a lot of our programs that we provide.”

Ney says the thrift store brings in hundreds of thousands of dollars each year to support women’s and men’s services like Amethyst House, Lilli House and counseling programs.

Read more at BC Local News.

 

Tide Change Editor’s note: I had a meeting last week with a staff member of Comox Valley Transition Society in preparation for an article regarding their main fundraising event in February. Neither she or I had any idea that this would happen and a greater need was about to challenge our community to respond in unity.

 

Jolene Rudisuela

Comox Valley Record