The recently published Hornby Marine Atlas is an important model for community conservation. Comox Valley Nature will be hosting  long time residents of Hornby Island Grant Scott and Mike Berman, who are directors of Conservancy Hornby Island (CHI) will be speaking at the Sunday Oct. 15, 2017 at 7:00pm in the Rotary Room of the Filberg Seniors Centre at 411 Anderton, Courtenay.  

CHI has embarked on a long term planning process to protect the incredible marine values around Hornby and within the central Salish Sea. As Mike says, “There is marine protection with Marine Parks and conservation areas to the north and south of us but very little for the central Salish Sea. We need to build a coalition of communities in our area to work together to protect these amazing waters and the waters and sea life creatures who live here.”

Grant will be presenting a Power Point with maps, pictures and the description of the marine values around Hornby on the following topics; salmon and salmon spawning habitat, groundfish such as rockfish, halibut, etc, winter and summer seabirds, marine mammals including sea lions, elephant seals, whales, herring and other forage fish, shellfish and others. The presentation will also include the shellfish aquaculture tenures as well as the legal jurisdictions including First Nations who control activities over the marine environment. Many of the commercial marine species are at historically low population levels and this will be discussed. While maps and data are important to Hornbyites, others wanted a hard copy of the information. The idea of a Hornby Marine Atlas was born.

Mike, who is publisher of the Atlas will be discussing how the maps and data that were prepared for community presentation was turned into a marine atlas. He will be explaining how each of the topics or chapters in the Atlas include a map, pictures and text to describe the marine values or protection issues. He will be describing how our very talented team researcher, editors and graphic designers gathered photographs and local knowledge and worked together to produce the final Atlas. Mike will be discussing how the Atlas was funded and how it will be used to further the marine conservation goals of CHI.

Comox Valley Nature is a non-profit society affiliated to BC Nature consisting only of unpaid volunteers. CVN fulfills its educational mandate by hosting monthly lectures, organizing free weekly guided hikes for members, and a free monthly walk open to the public.  Comox Valley Nature also supports specialized groups (Birding, Botany, Garry Oak Restoration, Wetland Restoration, Photography and Young Naturalists Club) which have separate monthly activities.  Membership in BC Nature and Comox Valley Nature is $30 per adult and $40 for a family.

Founded in 1966, it is one of the oldest environmental societies on the North Island.  Meetings and lectures of the Comox Valley Naturalists Society are held on the third Sunday of most months at the Florence Filberg Centre, 411 Anderton, Courtenay.  Meetings and guided walks are open to the public, including children and youth.  Lecture is free, though a $4 contribution from non-members is appreciated. New memberships are always welcomed.

Anyone interested in this lecture or participating in CVNS activities can also contact us at the website http://comoxvalleynaturalist.bc.ca

Loys Maingon

Comox Valley Nature